As of August 2017, the Darien District 61 Educational Foundation has awarded nearly $65,000 in teacher grants and direct aid to students. Read more about the variety of projects our grants have supported during the past seven years.

2016-2017 school year — Mini-Grants

For the Mini-Grant application period ended Oct. 15, 2016, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $963. Applications are accepted throughout the school year with three deadlines–Oct. 15, Jan. 15 and March 15–for grants of up to $500 each.

  • $463 for an initiative at Lace School dubbed “Full S.T.E.A.M. Ahead!” using elements of science, technology, engineering, art/design and mathematics to build critical-thinking skills and bolster creativity. As the teacher requesting the grant said in her application, “STEAM materials help us think like an architect or engineer and challenge our creative minds.” The grant funds will be used to purchase a variety of building materials for hands-on projects as well as books for the STEAM Library.
  • $500 to purchase supplies for a student mentoring program being developed at Lace School. The program is designed to support students needing extra teacher-student interaction.  Students recommended for the program will be matched with a teacher or staff volunteer for weekly mentoring meetings. Teachers will plan activities based on the interests of the students and provide supplies such as journals, reading materials, arts and crafts, games and other items.

For the Mini-Grant application period ended Jan. 15, 2017, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $650.

  • $350 to fund two lunchtime literacy-based programs in the library at Eisenhower Junior High. The grant will provide $150 to purchase books for three additional sessions of the popular “Reading with the General.” And $200 will be used to buy books for an Out to Lunch Book Club for seventh-graders. Clubs were already held for the sixth- and eighth-graders.
  • $300 for a reprise of the “March Madness Tournament of Books” at Lace School. The all-school competition, loosely based on the popular NCAA tourney, starts with “brackets” totaling 16 books. Over several weeks, students in each grade will read books or listen to books being read to them and vote on their favorites. The winners are narrowed to a “Final Four,” with an eventual champion chosen based on the students’ votes. New this year: eight books are in the literature category and eight are in the informational category. Which genre will win it all?

For the Mini-Grant application period ended March 15, 2017, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $848.

  • $498 to Mark DeLay School to expand the popular Reading Incentive Program started in September 2016. The first Friday of each month, passages from a book are read to the entire school over the PA system by a mystery guest reader. Each classroom is given a copy of the book so students can take turns borrowing it to share with family members. At the end of the month, the books are placed in the classroom library for independent reading. Funds from this grant will buy additional copies of books to be placed on bus line reading carts.
  • $350 to Mark DeLay School for seven sets of Legos for use in various STEM-related classroom projects. Throughout the year, the second-grade teachers plan a number of activities involving science and math concepts. Many of those involve building, which is where the Lego sets allow the young students to put their lessons—and their creativity—to work.

2016-2017 school year – Annual Grants

  • $7,350 to Eisenhower Junior High to continue and expand its “One Book, One School” program launched last year. For two semesters, each EJH family will receive a copy of a designated book, encouraging students, family and school staff to read the book together as a community, “discussing, sharing and enjoying.” As the teachers noted in their grant request, in addition to curriculum objectives, two goals are just as important: inspiring students to read for pleasure and creating lifelong readers and learners.
  • $2,150 to Mark DeLay School to purchase a variety of books for an Independent Reading Initiative. As the teachers noted in their grant application, “the more interested and successful a child becomes in reading, the more he or she will continue reading. A positive reading cycle begins. The less a student reads, the smaller the reading progress. The student loses interest and a downward cycle is created.” This grant funds a broad selection of books that students can access before and after school, in bus lines and at lunch. The teachers cited research showing that students not only need the skills to read, but the motivation and opportunity to do so. Read more about these two grants

 

2015-2016 school year — Mini-Grants

For the Mini-Grant application period ended Oct. 15, 2015, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $979. Applications are accepted throughout the school year with three deadlines–Oct. 15, Jan. 15 and March 15–for grants of up to $500 each. Read more about the grants

  • $500 for Eisenhower Junior High teachers to start a lunch-time program called “Reading with the General.” Each month, a “general” will be recruited—it could be the principal, a teacher, a Darien police officer, a parent, etc.—who would read aloud the first chapter of a popular teen book as students eat lunch in the library. One copy of the book would be raffled among students attending the reading sessions and four copies would be placed in the school library.
  • $479 for teachers at Mark DeLay School to upgrade the music curriculum using GamePlan, a well-respected general music curriculum that emphasizes singing, instruments, movement and creativity. The funds will be used for grade-level books and materials for all students in kindergarten through second grade.

For the Mini-Grant application period ended Jan. 15, 2016, the Foundation awarded three grants totaling $1,200.

  • $500 for a “March Madness Tournament of Books” at Lace School. The all-school competition starts with “brackets” totaling 16 books. Over several weeks, students in each grade will read books or listen to books being read to them and vote on their favorites. The winners are narrowed to a “Final Four,” with an eventual champion chosen based on the students’ votes.
  • $400 for “Ready, Set, Write!” at Lace. The funds will buy “mentor texts” to help model the writing style of different authors, as well as a variety of supplies for the classroom’s writers’ workshop. The goal is to “make writing contagious” in the classroom, helping students love to write and “catch the writing fever!”
  • $300 for “Chirping Chicks,” offering third-graders at Lace the chance to see live farm animals in the classroom by experiencing the birth of baby chicks—a smaller version of the popular exhibit at Chicago’s Museum of Science and Industry. The funds will buy equipment for the hatchery such as a temperature-controlled incubator, an automatic egg turner and a feeder for the chicks.

For the Mini-Grant application period ended March 15, 2016, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $790.

  • $500 for “Excited About Reading!” at Mark DeLay School. The literacy-oriented program will spotlight an author each month for the remainder of the school year. Funds would be used to purchase the monthly book selections and supplies to update the “Authors Bulletin Board.”
  • $290 for “Let’s Get Moving in Music,” also at Mark DeLay, to purchase a CD set and books to promote movement/dance in the music curriculum.

2015-2016 school year – Annual Grants

  • Awarded $4,500 to Eisenhower Junior High for its “One Book, One School” program, which adapts a highly successful initiative already being used in schools across the country. Each EJH family will receive a copy of a designated book, encouraging students, family and school staff to read the book together as a community. “Creating lifelong readers, inspiring students to read for pleasure, and providing fun and social activities surrounding the book” are among the program goals cited in the grant request. Teachers noted that research shows family involvement in reading has been linked to higher academic achievement.
  • Awarded $4,500 to Lace School to fund “Lace Reads Together,” also designed to make reading a shared family experience. One chapter book will be selected and every Lace family will be given a copy of the book to keep. Discussion will be part of regular classroom instruction, but other activities involving the selected book include trivia contests during morning announcements, assemblies, group activities and even a Family Night. Read more about these two grants

 

2014-2015 school year — Mini-Grants

For the Mini-Grant application period ended Oct. 15, 2014, the Foundation awarded six grants totaling $2,630.

  • Two $500 grants for “Books Come Alive!” to help reduce ticket prices to provide a live theater experience for third-graders from Lace School. The students will read and discuss a novel in class and then see the same story performed at a local theater.
  • $415 for teachers at Lace School to buy one soprano and two alto glockenspiels—small metal xylophones. The instruments will be used in Orff-based music instruction, which is a comprehensive study of rhythm, melody, harmony, accompanying, performing, improvising and composing. Instruction will include individual and group lessons as well as whole-class activities.
  • $456 for teachers at Mark DeLay School to buy two alto and two soprano glockenspiels along with four sets of mallets. The instruments also will be used in Orff-based comprehensive music instruction.
  • $350 for six math station kits for use by third-grade students at Lace School. The stations and related materials allow hands-on activities that help students working on math-fact fluency and other curriculum-related activities. The stations will be used during class as well as for independent learning.
  • $409 for a full school year’s subscription to “Nutrition Nuggets,” monthly newsletters offering ideas to help parents boost their children’s healthy eating and exercise habits. Content covers all grade levels, K through 8. The newsletters also will be available on each school’s website.

For the Mini-Grant application period ended Jan. 15, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $915.

  • $500 for “Social Studies that Stick!” The program is for third-graders at Lace School as they learn about people and cultures in the U.S. and around the world. The money will be used to buy books, games and supplies to enhance independent learning activities.
  • $415 for “Our Diversified Classroom Library” at Eisenhower Junior High. The grant will fund new books for classroom libraries with diverse stories featuring protagonists and other characters from a broad spectrum of cultural, ethnic and socio-economic backgrounds.

For the Mini-Grant application period ended March 15, the Foundation awarded two grants totaling $1,000.

  • $500 for the purchase of special “tools” designed to help students with sensory-processing issues stay focused during class. The grant requested by teachers at Mark DeLay School will fund sensory fidgets and other products proven to enhance students’ attentiveness.
  • $500 for “Active Seating in the Classroom” at Mark DeLay School. The grant will fund the purchase of five Hokki Stools, which allow young students to move about the classroom with minimal distraction. Research shows that such movement can improve students’ ability to focus and stay alert during class, enhancing the learning process.

2014-2015 school year – Annual Grants

  • Provided $8,325 for “Lace Reads Together,” designed to foster a shared experience where everyone in the Lace School community is collectively reading the same book at the same time. Guided discussions take place during regular language-arts class time to work on goals such as comprehension and fluency. At-home reading activities, school assemblies, trivia contests and family nights are also part of the fun. One book will be chosen in the fall and another in the spring. The program includes visits from professional authors, who discuss the art of writing and story-telling and what it takes to start with a simple idea and end up with a book keeps readers spellbound for hours.
  • Established an “iPod Listening Literacy Center” at Lace School, offering yet another tool to help students improve their reading skills. The $1,000 grant will help get the center up and running through the purchase of six iPod Nano devices and a collection of audio books. The listening center will be able to accommodate up to six students at a time and also complement the existing “leveled library” of printed books already available for students at all reading levels.

Learn more about these grants, totaling $9,325

2013-2014 school year

  • Awarded a grant for Mark DeLay and Lace schools for the purchase of 10 iPad Mini’s—five for each school—and specialized apps for the schools’ resource rooms. The use of iPads, which are already widely available in all District 61 schools, has proved highly successful because of the increasing number of apps available, including many designed specifically for students with learning challenges. The apps help strengthen reading, writing and math skills. And they’re not only educational, they’re fun!

Learn more about this grant, totaling $3,500

2012-2013 school year

  • Helped start “Make a Statement,” a program at Mark DeLay school that aims to help younger students learn how to use technology and improve their writing skills while also spotlighting the students’ artistic talents. Using iPads, students access an educational website that serves as an online gallery of their artwork–for friends and family to see–where the students will write an “artist’s statement” about their work.
  • Supported a program at Lace School designed to increase student achievement, especially for special-education classes. A small number of iPads dedicated to the school’s resource room offer students alternative tools in learning, especially in reading and math, through a variety of educational apps.
  • Funded a pilot program at Eisenhower Junior High that helps students develop their “executive function” skills—such as strategic thinking, problem-solving, time management and goal-directed behaviors.
  • Helped expand a popular monthly after-school program at Lace School started in the previous year dubbed “Reading with the Stars!” A faculty or staff member—the “Star Reader”–introduces a favorite book, explains why it’s a favorite, and reads aloud from the story. As a new twist, local or regional authors make guest appearances to talk about their books and answer questions about being a professional writer.

Learn more about these grants, totaling more than $7,900

 

2011-2012 school year

  • Launched a program at Lace School titled “Reading with the Stars!”—designed to engage students who already know how to read but don’t show much interest in doing so. Once a month, an invited teacher or staff member–the “Star Reader”–introduces a favorite book, explains why the book is special, and reads passages aloud to the students. The program also includes fun activities that allow students to be the first ones to read the “Star Reader’s” favorite book.
  • Supported a project titled “Raising Student Reading Achievement,” which provides extra interventions to help English Language Learners and struggling readers. The program aims to improve comprehension with a wide variety of books and other materials that meet each student at their individual reading levels.
  • Funded the purchase of new science-related books for the “Leveled Library” at Mark DeLay–permanent additions for students at all reading levels that will help supplement the kindergarten, first- and second-grade science curriculum while at the same time helping students learn to read and love to read.

Learn more about these grants, totaling more than $5,400

 

2010-2011 school year

  • Added to the “Leveled Library” at Mark DeLay School to support “guided reading” for students in grades K-2.  Guided reading involves teaching small groups of students at their individual reading levels to best meet their educational needs. To maximize guided reading, students need a wide variety of reading material.
  • Expanded the “iPod Touch Enhanced Instruction for English Language Learners” program for students in grades 3-5 at Lace School. The grant funded two more iPod Touch devices in the ELL classroom and helped purchase apps and other student materials for the program, which emphasizes hands-on, interactive learning.

Total grants for 2010-2011 school year: $1,000